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    Russell Boedeker

    Well I’ll be the first to ask a question. How much should the client interpret the meaning of the cards, i.e. what each card means for them in their situation or question, vs. how much should that come from yourself as the expert reader? How do you know where to draw the line if the client is going to far astray vs. letting them get in touch with what the cards are meaning in their situation?

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    Peter Grover

    When were some of the first known tarot cards created and do they originate from a specific cultural tradition?

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    Russell R. Boedeker

    The sun card seems like an always positive one. The image of the sun with rebirth. My card deck has a young child on the back of a horse. The sun has a face, rather odd as we don’t think of the sun as having a face unlike the moon. I would see the sun standing for divine wisdom and us having a childlike confidence in the wisdom and strength given by God. Back to the face on the sun, like the moon – perhaps this is showing the merging of wisdom and intelligence with a childlike faith in the good things to come.

    The wall on my card deck is complete. A wall exists to separate something, keep something in or out. Perhaps the wall is there to show we need to set a limit on our wisdom, or that we cannot have complete connection with the above so as below in our limited human capacity.

    I feel more in this card, every time I feel like I can’t fully explain what I’m sensing.

    Reply
    Erik Arneson

    Russell, that’s a very insightful look at the Sun card. I usually superficially look at the Sun as a card meaning happiness, but your association with divine wisdom and confidence is a solid interpretation. Light is definitely a symbol of wisdom, and the Sun has long been a symbol of divinity. Good catch.

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    Russell R. Boedeker

    Interesting how different the card you showed is from the Rider-Waite deck. The five of swords I have shows me a much different message. I see someone reflecting on past actions and perhaps mistakes he has made, but now has more swords of knowledge at his disposal, but still problems and doubts remain with the two swords on the ground.

    Given such differences in messages how would you relate these in a reading if you used one deck vs. the other?

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    Reverend Erik

    Russell, that’s a great question! It’s worth a longer answer than the short one I’m about to give.

    Whenever I read a card, I start with a basic meaning that I try to apply across all the decks that I read with. Then, I apply to that basic meaning the specific symbolism and nuances of the particular deck and card.

    That might sound complicated, but I’ve found that it makes the process of learning to work with a new deck much simpler.

    Reply
    Devlinski

    In a word ‘intuition?’. One persons interpretation may appear or possibly ‘is’ totally opposed to the other.. But like siblings, they are all relative and loved equally? One man’s meat etc…

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    Russell R. Boedeker

    Ah yes, the childlike qualities of the six of cups. Hard to see in the gummy bears, in the Rider Waite version it is interesting that the face of the person can be seen as either an older woman or a young child. I can blink my eyes and almost see both change back and forth.

    The aspects of having that childlike innocence in our emotions and approach to life, yet coupled with the knowledge and wisdom of being an adult. Children have a natural faith, a curiosity, and open to new ideas . Is it any wonder the admonition given by Jesus when he said “I assure you: Whoever does not welcome the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” (Mark 10:15).

    I agree, a good card to have. May signify that we need to look at some things in our life with the mindset of a child.

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    Russell R Boedeker

    I see the queen of wands as a personification of the mastery of the wand – the inner fire – that can drive you towards your passions. Great to have for self confidence and spiritual mastery of your situation. She seems relaxed, aware of her capabilities and not defensive. Yes in all the enthusiasm there are claws!

    Reply
    Reverend Erik

    I usually view the Kings as the mastery cards, and the Queens as experts at decision-making. But I definitely see what you’re talking about.

    Reply
    Sean

    Thanks so much for checking out my guest post! I’m glad you liked it. As I said in the article, I’m sure my method isn’t for everyone, and I’m sure I’ll make modifications to it over the years, but it certainly serves me well and works with my thought process, rather than counter to it like many other journaling systems.

    Reply
    Reverend Erik

    You’re welcome! If you keep using your journaling system, you’re going to end up with a wealth of material to share with others.

    Reply
    Russell R. Boedeker

    I’ve been waiting for this card! Thanks for your explanation, I can relate very closely to my understanding. While on the surface this card appears to be the great evil who swept a third of the stars under his control. My Rider-Waite deck has a naked man and woman chained to the devil. I can see that this devil did not create the people, they created the devil (in this case) by their own thoughts and actions, and have enslaved themselves to him. That our own perverse will, desires and imaginations can give birth to an enslaved evil. What have you enslaved yourself to?

    One could also envision that if we live in a state of sin we have bound ourselves as slaves to sin. And yes the light of truth will provide release – although the Rider-Waite deck being in chains release via the flame is a bit less obvious.

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    Reverend Erik

    The materialistic chains of the Devil make me think of the hardcore rejection of the material that was so common in some branches of Gnosticism. I think by combining the Devil with Temperance, we learn that though we must exist in the material world, we don’t have to be consumed by it.

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    Russell R Boedeker

    An interesting commentary. I’ve not thought of the fool as being the clueless magician. I am confused by your explaining. One point you describe him as a new beginning, but not without understanding what to do next. In another section he is described as the clueless ignorant. How do I reconcile these two aspects?

    Is the real aspect that of the fool has a new beginning in front of him that might seem as madness, but it might just signify a new path for you to take?

    Second question – where do you put the fool? At the front as the “0” card or at the end?

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    Reverend Erik

    Hi Russell!

    Good observation. I should have explained that more clearly. When the Fool starts the journey, he might not realize that he’s ignorant. It’s not until he becomes the Magician that he realizes that he was once ignorant.

    Sometimes I look at the Fool as being on the wrong end of the Dunning-Kruger effect. If you haven’t heard of it, check it out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

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    Reverend Erik

    Oh, and to answer your question, I put the Fool at 0. However, there was an occultist who put the Fool at 0, just after The World and just before The Magician. He read the greater arcana as an endless cycle. I like that interpretation.

    Unfortunately, I can’t find the guy’s name at the moment, but it’s somewhere in Decker and Dummett’s book.

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    Russell R Boedeker

    Thanks, good guidance. I’ve tried something like this before with good results. Just need discipline to do it more often.

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    Reverend Erik

    Yeah, that’s the hard part. It helps to keep a journal, too.

    Supposedly, committing something to memory before bed is more effective than in the morning, so an evening meditation might be better.

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    Ralph Maldonado

    You most definitely should give both songs and their videos close study. You could write an entire post on just the many meanings of the song title ‘Blackstar.’ Besides the reference to a certain type of cancer lesion, and the occult references to the black sun, and the midnight sun in alchemy and mythology, there’s are interesting coincidences on a more personal level.

    Evidently, Elvis Presley, who shares a birthday with Bowie (Jan. 8), recorded a song that was never released called ‘Black Star.’ Presley’s ‘Black Star’ was also a song about mortality.

    https://youtu.be/w_UHZ_62GCI

    Every man has a black star

    A black star over his shoulder

    And when a man sees his black star

    He knows his time, his time has come
    Black star don’t shine on me, black star

    Black star keep behind me, black star

    There’s a lot of livin’ I gotta do

    Give me time to make a few dreams come true, black star

    Pretty weird, huh? Undoubtedly Bowie was aware of this and used it; its just another example of his artistic multilevel brilliance. Until this final album, Bowie didn’t really use occult themes after Station To Station – or if he did they were extremely subtle; though he clearly seems to have struggled with spiritual issues and questions of mortality all through his career and to the very end. But this last album gives us a context to begin to view Bowie’s artistic and spiritual vision.

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    Jeff

    It is humbling to consider the Platonic dialogues and to notice that some, if not all, are all based on one of the characters memory. Implying to me a previous oral tradition which began to be written. One in particular, The Parmenides, one that seems fits the model for Bruno. Studying Pierre Grimes Phd. work he lays out quite well the structure of the dialectic and binds it with the concepts of analogy and the make up of a 3 and 4 term analogies. Quite fascinating and of which the Parmenides is a ‘go to’ for such a structure. Such a seemingly daunting task made easier by use of its structure as in the article above and as Bruno has written.

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    Reverend Erik

    I have not read the Parmenides, but in Phaedrus, Socrates recounts an old Egyptian tale about the importance of memory: “And in this instance, you who are the father of letters, from a paternal love of your own children have been led to attribute to them a quality which they cannot have; for this discovery of yours will create forgetfulness in the learners’ souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves.”

    The Art of Memory that Bruno’s work is based on was supposedly invented by Simonides, who lived in the 6th-5th c. BCE. I will read the Parmenides and check out Pierre Grimes’ work. Thanks!

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    Jeff

    Wonderful quote from the Phaedrus, thank you. I had forgotten that. Pierre has a wonderful video on YouTube on the Phaedrus ” Out of body experience in the Phaedrus” . will post a link when I get a chance.

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    Scott Greene

    of all the writings, it seems alot about hermetic phylosphy, and related thinking. This is a very interesting subject, I read regularly to keep wisdom sharp.

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    Arnemancy : The Tarot Memory Deck

    […] alphabet and wheel system opens up interesting possibilities. I’ve written before about using tarot with the Art of Memory. Now let’s look at using the Taro with Bruno’s memory system. If you have used Tarot […]

    Reply
    Skip Mendler

    The sigils underneath the big black star are supposed to be the letters “B O W I E.”

    I know, I didn’t quite get it either.

    After I had spent some time with a Gurdjieff/Ouspensky-based study group, my attention was caught by this lyric from Suffragette City: “Hey man/my school is insane/hey man/my work’s down the drain…”

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    Al Rumsch

    I like that your explanation differentiates between external experience and internal understanding. In this weeks lectionary (John 10:25) ἀπεκρίθη αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς· εἶπον ὑμῖν καὶ οὐ πιστεύετε· τὰ ἔργα ἃ ἐγὼ ποιῶ ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ πατρός μου ταῦτα μαρτυρεῖ περὶ ἐμοῦ· ….makes me wonder what things people experienced that caused them to believe the things they did about Jesus. Anyhow, that is the art of translation, to try to figure out what the words meant to the people who wrote them.

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    Arnemancy : Who is Asclepius?

    […] Asclepius was so good at bringing people back from the dead that he angered Hades, king of the underworld and god of the dead. Hades complained to Zeus, and Zeus struck Asclepius down with a thunderbolt. In retaliation, Apollo then slew all of the Cyclopes who were responsible for forging Zeus’s thunderbolts. After some squabbling, Zeus brought Asclepius out of the underworld and placed him in the sky as the constellation Ophiuchus.2 […]

    Reply
    Arnemancy : Who is Asclepius?

    […] The Rod of Asclepius is often confused with the caduceus of Hermes, which is a winged staff with two snakes twined about it. Neither the caduceus nor the Rod seem to be very important in Hermetic philosophy, though they are pretty common symbols in Renaissance Hermeticism. […]

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    Freeman Presson

    It’s quite true that there are different systems of astrology: sidereal vs tropical Zodiacs, dozens of house systems (which makes much less difference than it sounds like it should), and a wealth of techniques within each system. The difference between all of those things and the crackpot idea that there should be 13 signs is that the existing systems have the internal consistency that comes from generations of practice, whereas the Ophiuchus flap is just a lame thought experiment intended as a reductio ad absurdum of all of astrology.

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    Reverend Erik

    I haven’t read any of the books about including Ophiuchus, such as Walter Berg’s “The 13 Signs of the Zodiac”. But if it’s a useful symbol set and it seems to work for a practitioner, then I see no problem with it.

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    Daniel

    I dont think its difficult to reconcile the idea of ‘gnosis’ with an unknowable ‘all’. Gnosis could be considered to mean the subjective and intuitive ‘knowledge’ which occurs in the absence of thought, while the ‘all’ remains rationally and objectively unknowable.

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    Russell R Boedeker

    I just ordered the book by Brother Dunning. I can have him sign it in person in March.

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    Catherine Joan

    Hello I enjoy your blog. A question regarding Qabalah study: is it absolutely essential to be pretentious? (haha) Anyway thanks for pointing me to the chicken book and I look forward to exploring the rest of your blog

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    Reverend Erik

    Ha! I think one of the great things about “Chicken Qabalah” is that it urges you to not be pretentious. That’s tough with Qabalah study. It’s so technical and precise that the temptation is strong once you start understanding any of it!

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    Aaron David

    Thought provoking article, and well written!

    I believe there is a great mystery with Goat and (H)Anael. Saturn and Venus. Chaos and Babalon. On and on. Crowley gives much insight into this mystery in Liber A’Ash. I also found insight in Ashen Chassan’s evocation of Anael. But the greatest insight is what I believe is my own experience of them which still, with all this, I cannot pretend to begin to understand. Rather, I watch it continue to unfold. I believe Baphomet is what must be encountered first in the process. He is the Prima Materia and is a representation of the Jungian Shadow, as well as Choronzon, the Dweller on the Threshold. He is dissolution itself.

    Just some thoughts…

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    Reverend Erik

    I am not super familiar with Ashen Chassan’s work, but I assume you mean “Gateways through Light & Shadow”? I pulled that beast off my shelf and read the Anael evocation this morning. Trying to connect that to this card is hard for me. I haven’t found a reason for Anael/Hanael to be connected to the Devil card that really resonates with me yet.

    On the Tree, BOTA puts the Devil between Hod and Tifaret, which certainly doesn’t help clear up the symbolism for me. There’s a lot more to figure out in the Hermetic Tarot’s Devil card. This is one of the reasons I don’t like reading with the deck—every card leaves me with more questions than answers!

    Thank you for your thoughts. I have a lot to ponder! Also, I have been enjoying “Charm the Water”. Great job!

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    FREEMAN PRESSON

    The best recent commentary on the Emerald Tablet is that of Martin Faulks: The Emerald Tablet – A Commentary on the Path of the True Adept. I was so impressed by it that I sent copies to several friends and teachers.

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    One of Many of The One

    Nice article, I will look for those other books, thanks!

    I actually perceived The Kybalion as more of a “scientific” philosophy and the Corpus Hermeticum as gnostic superstitions and/or apologetics; the former seemed concerned mainly with understanding the hierarchy and natural processes of life in the Cosmos and how to gain mental mastery over the mental nature of the Universe, while the latter seemed focused more on the relative/absolute aspects of Good vs Evil, praising God, praising God some more, praise, praise, praise…

    If anyone is looking for a book similar to The Kybalion, I suggest The Arcane Teaching by William Walker Atkinson (the same author of The Kybalion). It’s like a great follow-up book which he published 1 year after The Kybalion. The “laws” and principles are essentially repeated yet structured quite differently. The key differences, however, are more in-depth explanations of the Cosmic Day/Night cycle and of the astral planes, and it asserts how the Absolute “God,” or the All, is NOT Mind, as was “erroneously” stated in past occult writings (aka, The Kybalion!) and that it is the Cosmos itself (a World-Brain as it says) which is the one living Mind – this revelation is more in accordance with parts of the Corpus Hermeticum (despite the back/forth idea of the absolute God being Mind or not; the CH does, indeed, contain contradictions!).

    I’ve only had a chance to read the one translated by G.R.S. Mead and another unidentified translation or version of the CH. I had already planned to get the one by Copenhaver very soon to see how well it compares!

    I have yet to read Initiation Into Hermetics by Franz Bardon, but it’s what is usually recommended to me – especially the most recent translation from the Merkur publishing company. I should also mention A Bardon Companion by Rawn Clark, which is meant to be a follow-up book to IIH.

    The Emerald Tablets of Thoth the Atlantean (not to be confused with the extremely short and rather uninspiring/disappointing Emerald Tablet of Hermes) was a quite interesting read; very poetic/rhythmic, which mainly tells the tale of what supposedly happened in Atlantis and afterwards when he settled in Egypt. It speaks an awful lot of the Halls of Amenti and how to avoid being trapped by some demonic Dweller in what I can only assume is a lower astral plane. Also included is a meditation ritual aimed at providing the practitioner with virtual immortality (so that we can live for hundreds of years just like Hermes and other ancient figures supposedly had lived). Not sure if it all has anything remotely to do with Hermeticism, but it was fun to read!

    I have a ton of more reading to do, thanks again for the recommendations!

    Anyway, even if The Kybalion isn’t 100% genuine Hermetic philosophy, it’s still a wonderful starting place for anyone interested in learning about occultism or mental influence in general. I recently gifted someone a copy of it to be used as a self-help guide! 😉

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    Reverend Erik

    Yes, I still like the Kybalion for a great introduction to modern occult philosophy. It is a mystical primer for New Thought, which ushered in a huge segment of esoteric thinking, especially in America. Mitch Horowitz has done a lot of work exploring this, so his work is worth exploring, too, if you’re interested in this material.

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    Freeman Presson

    I first heard about the memory palace when I was maybe 19 (from Professor Lettvin at MIT). I put it aside because “I suck at visualizing.” I think it might be time to fix that. Also, Jonathan Foer wrote a book on memory, Moonwalking with Einstein. I’m debating whether to get the Yates book or just jump to the Foer.

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    Reverend Erik

    There’s supposedly a disorder called aphantasia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphantasia) that has to do with an inability to visualize. But usually, I think good visualization just takes practice. I was lucky enough to get started with the technique in high school, and encouraged to practice even more when I worked through DMK’s “Modern Magick” in 1999/2000. It gets easier with time and makes everything much more amazing. Everything.

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    Matthew D. Johnson

    I get what you are saying, but I very respectfully disagree. The Kybalion is definitely a product of the New Thought movement, but that movement was inspired by the New Testament which had a strong Hermetic influence. Compare the first chapter of John to the Pimander. Also read The Emerald Tablet and read The Kybalion again. It is all the same idea, the Kybalion is simply restating it in 20th century language. Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, SRIA, HOGD, the original OTO, Thelema, New Thought, Amorc, Wicca, Bardon…it all descends from the same tree, the Hermetic root/DNA. As above, so below. Panentheism. I am a part of the Divine, I and the Father are one. It is all the same. The Kybalion is part of the Hermetic tradition. It didn’t just end with the Corpus Hermeticum. The Kybalion is one of many modern Hermetic books and the reason it is such a classic is because it takes what is obscure and teaches it in language that is much more clear and easier to grasp. There were good books before it and after it, all Hermetic. The New Thought movement is totally Hermetic if you really think about it, minus all the allegories, false blinds, etc.

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    Reverend Erik

    A close reading of the Kybalion reveals a cosmology which is not only very specific, but departs from the Corpus Hermeticum and late-antiquity monotheism. You can read about the cosmological issues in some of the links in this article. I also drill down into the very different concepts of divinity in the Kybalion and the CH in this article: https://arnemancy.com/articles/hermeticism/the-nature-of-god-in-the-kybalion-and-the-hermetica/

    Note that I am not arguing that all of those groups and philosophies you mentioned aren’t related. They certainly are. Definitely Hermeticism influenced the Kybalion, but that doesn’t mean that the Kybalion agrees entirely with Hermeticism. There are a few points in common, but overall, the Kybalion redefined Hermetic philosophy for the 20th century and produced something that is not the same as 19th century Hermeticism, Renaissance Hermeticism, or classical Hermetism. But yes, they are definitely related.

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    Seeker

    I think people are too judgemental of the Kybalion. Of course, its not a “real” book of hermetic writings, but really, what is? We do not have real evidence that the “real” writings where written by Hermes himself. Hermetism as we know it from the CH is a synthesis of many late-antiquity schools of thought ascribed to Hermes. The same goes for The Kybalion. Both offer useful insights and will not coincide in many respects.

    In my view, the longest running wisdom tradition is Platonism. It’s transmission is quite documented. Iamblichus said that Pythagoras and Plato studied the ancient Hermetic pillars in Egypt and thus communicated its wisdom in Greece.

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    Reverend Erik

    Hi Mario! I would suggest starting with “The Chicken Qabalah of Rabbi Lamed ben Clifford” by Lon Milo Duquette. It’s a great beginning book!

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    FREEMAN PRESSON

    I had already proposed a name for the principle of “name anything, someone has or will have based a Tarot deck on it.” The name? Rule 78, of course!

    Reply
    Freeman Presson

    Rune Soup, Occult of Personality, The Hermetic Hour, Speaking of Jung, The Astrology Podcast, Exploring Astrology, Hermetic Astrology… there are more, but those are what I follow most closely.

    Reply
    Niish

    Thank you for the inclusion of the time-arts piece in which you were instrumental!
    As ever, I am honored to call you a friend and Frater.

    Reply
    Jas

    Even though I have a different interpretation of elemental assignment (for me wands are air, and swords are fire), your viewpoint adds a deeper meaning when considering the love aspect of the sixes.

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    Arnemancy : Card of the Week: Eight of Cups

    […] Eights can be seen as cards of practicality and balance. In this card, the traveler retreats from the cups. He doesn’t engage with them, and instead is doing hard work. He treks up the hill, abandoning whatever emotional issue he was dealing with. Avoiding an issue isn’t always the best or most permanent option, but sometimes it’s a necessary one. […]

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    Andrew Watt

    It was this book that launched my efforts to a) learn the mansions of the Moon, and b) to create poetry around them (which is now available here). This book remains one of the keystones of my astrological practice and my magical practice, and I consult it at least once a week.

    Reply
    Randy Burleson

    Hey Erik,
    I am curious about hermeticism.
    I know nothing. I was looking for recommendations on where to start and asked a friend (Matt) and he pointed me to
    this article. Thanks!
    I think this may be more my speed starting out…
    Ha!
    The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Alchemy: The Magic and Mystery of the Ancient Craft Revealed for Today (Complete Idiot’s Guides) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1592577350/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_qDAKCbXFHH8MX

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    Andrew Watt

    This is a lovely article. One of the things that I hadn’t thought to do, before now, was to make a Memory Palace of the names of people who had something to do with teaching memory arts. Behold, a hall, with pagans on one side, and Christians on the other:

    Simonides on the end wall, the founder,

    then on his right, our left, the Pagans:
    Plato
    Aristotle
    Iamblichus
    Quintillian
    Seneca
    Cicero (with the pseudo-Cicero standing in the shadows behind, slipping a book Ad Herennium on to the pile of Cicero’s writing)

    Martanus Capella, the turning point, on the short wall of the gallery, facing Simonides

    And then the Christians:
    Augustine of Hippo
    Albertus Magnus
    Thomas Aquinas
    Ramon Llull
    Giovanni da San Gimignano
    Bartolomeo di San Concordo
    Giordano Bruno, tucked into the last corner behind an iron grate in the fireplace.

    Reply
    Andrew B. Watt

    Of course this is relevant to my current work, which is writing a manuscript about daily interaction with my tarot deck, and spread-sheeting the results. I started in December 2018, and I’m down to seven cards that haven’t yet come up in a reading; whenever one does come up, though, I write a page about the Minors and 2 pages about the Majors. It’s been grand.

    I think that in general, this is fantastic advice. It’s through Palace of Memory techniques that I’ve advanced as far as I have in Toastmasters (I give all of my speeches from Memory), and it’s been the basis for a lot of my work as a school teacher, and as a druid. I wish I were better at memorizing my own poetry, of course — but as pseudo-Cicero himself said, memory-of-topic or memory-of-idea is often more important than the memory-of-word, which takes a lot longer.

    I’m thinking about my Hall of Memory Artists construct that I left in an earlier blog post, and I really have to get back to rethinking that — the line Dominicans in a row, Albertus Magnus, Thomas Aquinas, the two others, Camillus in his theater (I remember him with the flower the camellia), and then Giordano Bruno in the fireplace… It’s the two in the middle of the line that I can’t recall clearly enough, although Albertus is pretty tall and sorta mangy, and Aquinas is popping out of a bowl of quinoa, (“Thomas a la quinoa!”)

    More to the point — Tarot, Astrology, Geomancy, iChing, Qabalah (however we want to spell it — JMGreer has said that a magical tradition is any three people who agree on the Romanization of Kabbalah), and nearly all of the divinatory and magical arts, are dependent on memory to one degree or another. The Decans, the Terms, the Signs, the Mansions, the Orphic Hymns… it’s possible to stuff our brains with Greek Magical Papyri like mad. Seamus Heaney, in his translation of Beowulf, describes the heroes opening their word-hoards, and not for nothing are the Mansions of the Moon called the treasure-house of images: learning 28 images reliably (or 78 in the Tarot), is a door into all kinds of powers and capacities… not because you can shoot “magic missile” or other matter-and-energy spells, but because you’ve cultivated an intimate level of knowledge in a body of a wisdom tradition that few know, and as a result you can speak deeply from the heart and change people’s minds or sway opinion. Of course, this means that you have to have a chance to speak… but wizards and witches are often good at doing that, too.

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    Reverend Erik

    Well, that’s a complicated question. First, I have a Masonic memory alphabet that I’ve created. So I’d use that. Next, it depends how comfortable I am with the ritual. Does it need to be word perfect, for instance? Do I just need help remembering specific letters?

    Reply
    DMajor

    As you begin to study the ritual, you will notice that your first memory palace has already been constructed. It stands waiting for you, along with a series of objects to observe and comment on as you walk through.

    Reply
    Arnemancy : Monotheism in Hermetism

    […] without denying the existence of others.”3 For example, in book I of the Corpus Hermeticum, Hermes Trismegistus experiences a vision of creation. During this vision, he sees multiple divine aspects being […]

    Reply
    Andrew B. Watt

    You get it! I’m glad that my article from so long ago was so useful in convincing another magician to walk this particular path; and you’ll likely convince a few others to walk this road, too. People will discover all sorts of useful things about this kind of work, in the long run, thanks to this effort on your part. Nicely done.

    Reply
    Reverend Erik

    I’ve already got plans for more magical vestments to go along with the robe. It acts as such a useful base garment — there is much more to be done! Can’t wait to experiment.

    Reply
    Arnemancy : Creating the Magical Robe

    […] the modern world, it must adopt the rainments of the modern world. I’ve written before about how I use modern materials in my craft. I’ve used polymer clay for talismans and replaced tin foil with aluminum. We can see that […]

    Reply

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